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Becoming an Expert Photographer Tip #2 Patterns & Symmetry

Patterns and symmetry are crucial in capturing that perfect shot

I’m back and sharing a second tip for those of you who want to become an expert cell-phone photographer! The first tip talked about the Rule of Thirds, which can be a little complicated but once understood, it makes a world of difference in shooting landscapes, people, animals, and much more.

The second tip I’d like to share is patterns and symmetry. I know it seems elementary, and that’s where you probably first learned about patterns and symmetry, but how does it apply to photography?

Patterns

For those of you who snoozed through your college art appreciation class or maybe zoned out during your high school art classes, I’m here to bring it back.

Photography is much more than just taking pictures; it is an art that has taken on new forms throughout the years. Though the photographs may have changed, the basic principles of photography have not, of which include subjects like balance, movement, rhythm, and more.

Pattern is one principal of art very similar to rhythm. Eloquently defined, pattern refers to a combination of elements or shapes repeated in a recurring and regular arrangement. Plainly speaking, a pattern is something shown over and over in a uniform manner.

  Verde  Louisville, CO

Verde Louisville, CO

It is most common to see patterns in a man-made setting, such as a city, though it is possible to see patterns in nature. Tiling and skyscraper windows are perfect examples of patterns. Identifying patterns and capturing the aesthetic of their “regular arrangement” makes for a pleasing photograph. Capturing patterns with your phone is easy and simply requires your camera phone’s positioning over the arrangement.
 

Symmetry

Just as pattern is a principle of art, symmetry is as well. Also known as “balance,” this principle is described as having “equal weight on equal sides of a centrally place fulcrum.” This means that each side of the piece is equal, not larger or smaller than the other.

  Verde  Louisville, CO

Verde Louisville, CO

 

Capturing symmetry on your camera phone is pretty simple, but can sometimes get in the way of the Rule of Thirds (read more about Rules of Thirds here). Look for objects that are similar on both sides. If you’re more of an artistic photographer, this will be easy as symmetry can come in many abstract forms.

Whatever your shooting, keep the principles of art in mind. Patterns and symmetry are important when photographing your subject so keep an eye out next time you pull out your camera phone!

Erin Cox